2018: World Development Report (English Version)

  • Title: 2018: World Development Report: Learning to Realize Education's Promise
  • Author: The World Bank Group
  • Description: Schooling is not the same as learning. In Kenya, Tanzania, and Uganda, when grade 3 students were asked recently to read a sentence such as “The name of the dog is Puppy,” three-quarters did not understand what it said.1 In rural India, just under three-quarters of students in grade 3 could not solve a two-digit subtraction such as 46 – 17, and by grade 5 half could still not do so.2 Although the skills of Brazilian 15-year-olds have improved, at their cur- rent rate of improvement they won’t reach the rich- country average score in math for 75 years. In reading, it will take more than 260 years.3 Within countries, learning outcomes are almost always much worse for the disadvantaged. In Uruguay, poor children in grade 6 are assessed as “not competent” in math at five times the rate of wealthy children.4 Moreover, such data are for children and youth lucky enough to be in school. Some 260 million aren’t even enrolled in primary or secondary school.5 These countries are not unique in the challenges they face. (In fact, they deserve credit for measuring student learning and making the results public.) Worldwide, hundreds of millions of children reach young adulthood without even the most basic life skills. Even if they attend school, many leave without the skills for calculating the correct change from a transaction, reading a doctor’s instructions, or inter- preting a campaign promise—let alone building a fulfilling career or educating their children. This learning crisis is a moral crisis. When deliv- ered well, education cures a host of societal ills. For individuals, it promotes employment, earnings, health, and poverty reduction. For societies, it spurs innovation, strengthens institutions, and fosters social cohesion. But these benefits depend largely on learning. Schooling without learning is a wasted opportunity. More than that, it is a great injustice: the children whom society is failing most are the ones who most need a good education to succeed in life.
  • Format: Pdf
  • Pages: 211

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    2018: World Development Report (Chinese Version 中文)

  • Title: 2018: World Development Report: Learning to Realize Education's Promise
  • Author: The World Bank Group
  • Description: Schooling is not the same as learning. In Kenya, Tanzania, and Uganda, when grade 3 students were asked recently to read a sentence such as “The name of the dog is Puppy,” three-quarters did not understand what it said.1 In rural India, just under three-quarters of students in grade 3 could not solve a two-digit subtraction such as 46 – 17, and by grade 5 half could still not do so.2 Although the skills of Brazilian 15-year-olds have improved, at their cur- rent rate of improvement they won’t reach the rich- country average score in math for 75 years. In reading, it will take more than 260 years.3 Within countries, learning outcomes are almost always much worse for the disadvantaged. In Uruguay, poor children in grade 6 are assessed as “not competent” in math at five times the rate of wealthy children.4 Moreover, such data are for children and youth lucky enough to be in school. Some 260 million aren’t even enrolled in primary or secondary school.5 These countries are not unique in the challenges they face. (In fact, they deserve credit for measuring student learning and making the results public.) Worldwide, hundreds of millions of children reach young adulthood without even the most basic life skills. Even if they attend school, many leave without the skills for calculating the correct change from a transaction, reading a doctor’s instructions, or inter- preting a campaign promise—let alone building a fulfilling career or educating their children. This learning crisis is a moral crisis. When deliv- ered well, education cures a host of societal ills. For individuals, it promotes employment, earnings, health, and poverty reduction. For societies, it spurs innovation, strengthens institutions, and fosters social cohesion. But these benefits depend largely on learning. Schooling without learning is a wasted opportunity. More than that, it is a great injustice: the children whom society is failing most are the ones who most need a good education to succeed in life.
  • Format: Pdf
  • Pages: 211

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    2018: The Future of Jobs Report 2018

  • Title: 2018: The Future of Jobs Report 2018
  • Author: World Economic Forum
  • Description: The emerging contours of the new world of work in the Fourth Industrial Revolution are rapidly becoming a lived reality for millions of workers and companies around the world. The inherent opportunities for economic prosperity, societal progress and individual flourishing in this new world of work are enormous, yet depend crucially on the ability of all concerned stakeholders to instigate reform in education and training systems, labour market policies, business approaches to developing skills, employment arrangements and existing social contracts. Catalysing positive outcomes and a future of good work for all will require bold leadership and an entrepreneurial spirit from businesses and governments, as well as an agile mindset of lifelong learning from employees. The fundamental pace of change has only accelerated further since the World Economic Forum published its initial report on this new labour market—The Future of Jobs: Employment, Skills and Workforce Strategy for the Fourth Industrial Revolution—in January 2016. With an increased need for tangible evidence and reliable information from the frontlines of this change, this new edition of the Future of Jobs Report once again taps into the collective knowledge of those who are best placed to observe the dynamics of workforces—executives, especially Chief Human Resources Officers, of some of the world’s largest employers—by asking them to reflect on the latest employment, skills and human capital investment trends across industries and geographies.
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  • Pages: 133

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    2018: Solving Future Skills Challenges

  • Title: 2018: Solving Future Skills Challenges
  • Author: Universities UK
  • Description: The fourth industrial revolution is driving comprehensive change in technology, the nature of work and the demand for skills. The jobs of the future are more likely to require higher level skills, and the supply of these skills will be critical to future success. This critical supply could be disrupted by an ageing population and uncertainty over immigration. These changes are increasingly complex and are occurring at an accelerated pace, with profound challenges to the ability of policymakers, employers, educators and learners to keep up. Increasing demand for higher level skills will be across a range of subjects, with humanities being as important as science and engineering, and across a range of levels, from sub-degree to postgraduate. Subjects and skills will need to be combined and re-learned throughout working life and the difference between academic and vocational qualifications, which is already blurred, will become less relevant, whereby a ‘whole-skills’ approach needs to be adopted. Subject-specific skills will need to be underpinned by a range of transferable skills. Work experience will be invaluable to developing learners who can apply their knowledge and skills to real-world problems and move easily between learning and working. To succeed in the future, learners will also need to think like employees, and employees will need to think like learners. The linear model of education–employment–career will no longer be sufficient. The pace of change is accelerating, necessitating more flexible partnerships, quicker responses, different modes of delivery and new combinations of skills and experience. Educators and employers need to collaborate more closely, and develop new and innovative partnerships and flexible learning approaches. Universities are committed to working with employers, of all sizes, and many employers recognise the value of collaborating with universities. These efforts need to be supported, enhanced and developed. Every effort must be made by government to adopt a whole-skills approach and to embed educator–employer partnerships across policy to support this.
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  • Pages: 29

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    2018: Technology in US schools: Are we preparing our kids for the jobs of tomorrow?

  • Title: 2018: Technology in US schools: Are we preparing our kids for the jobs of tomorrow?
  • Author: PWC
  • Description: A recent study conducted by PwC in conjunction with the Business- Higher Education Forum shows a concerning gap between the digital skills business leaders need to build a workforce of the future and educator’s ability to prepare students to meet those demands. The study has significant implications for workforce preparedness and the US economy. By 2020, 77% of all jobs will require some degree of technological skills, and there will be one million more computing jobs than applicants who can fill them. That means there’s a growing need for workers trained in STEM skills but a shortage of graduates who have them. In fact, according to PwC’s annual CEO Survey, 79% of US CEOs are concerned that a shortage of people with key skills could impair their companies’ growth. “The idea that hard work and determination are enough for anyone to become successful in America seems to be evaporating,” says Shannon Schuyler, head of PwC’s Responsible Business Leadership practice. “We believe that building the careers and the financial and technical skills of young people from underserved communities has never been more important.” In order to better understand the struggles teachers face in helping young people acquire digital skills, PwC conducted a survey of more than 2,000 K–12 educators in spring 2018. We also aimed to explore strategies to help educators equip students with the technology and career-readiness skills they need to be prepared for the jobs of today and tomorrow.
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  • Pages: 12

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    2018: Project Based Learning & Student Achievement

  • Title: 2018: Project Based Learning & Student Achievement: What Does the Research Tell Us?
  • Author: The driving question for this brief is based on the most common question that teachers, principals, school leaders, coaches, and grant writers ask us at the Buck Institute for Education (BIE) about Project Based Learning (PBL): What evidence exists that shows the impact of Project Based Learning on student learning in core content areas?
  • Description: BIE
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  • Pages: 11

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    2018: Innovations, Technologies and Research in Education

  • Title: Innovations, Technologies and Research in Education (SAMPLE)
  • Author: Cambridge Scholars Publishing
  • Description: n this article, the authors compare traditional learning and communication processes and contexts to new strategies and learning situations adapted to a hyper-connected world, and propose universal pedagogical principles designed for a globalised society where human-machine interaction is becoming commonplace. The development known as Industry 4.0, which merges the Internet of Things with Big Data and Artificial Intelligence, means that robotics, artificial intelligence agents, and hybrid reality universes are expanding and creating their own hypermediated transmedia ecosystems, where some sort of machine intelligence is involved in at least one end of an exchange. The informational component of Industry 4.0 has been called Information 4.0. The main goal of the research presented here is to identify the educational skills needed for learning in Information 4.0 ecosystems. We are interested in identifying the communicational competencies teachers and students will need in a world where humans and machines will be extremely connected and permanently updating. Our central hypothesis is that in the era of Information 4.0, skills for communication and information management must be related to the highest level of PISA reading competence and global literacy: reflecting on content and form, drawing upon one’s knowledge, opinions, or attitudes beyond the information provided, and accepting different perspectives and viewpoints. The authors' initial studies mentioned in this article have helped them design an operative roadmap for Information 4.0, designed to help students learn what nobody knows yet. They suggest clear steps for a roadmap and have developed a three-level approach to learning and communicating in Information 4.0 ecosystems that incorporates principles from Bloom’s Revised Taxonomy, and 2 Chapter One proposals for developing global competencies that include support for values and ethical sustainable action, from the OECD and UNESCO. Key words: Introduction An important tenet of education states that the limit of children’s performance, when demonstrating what they know, is their ability to communicate (Wittgenstein 1922). Language mastery is crucial for developing cognitive skills and allowing hidden mental processes to emerge (Council of Europe 2015). We only know about children’s reading abilities if they can speak, write, or produce kinetic feedback about a text, which reveals the invisible processes to the teacher. In digital environments, hidden learning processes are revealed by production, participation, and sharing on social media platforms. The main difference between these two situations is that in the digital context, there is an important component of technological mediation and connectivity. The hidden processes already exist in human cognition, and we can see them proliferating now in the digital ecosystem built through machine interactions, known as “Information 4.0” (http://information4zero.net). The proliferation of connected, autonomous objects known as the Internet of Things is leading us toward an uncertain and unseen horizon of interconnected wearable, embedded, and implanted devices. The development known as Industry 4.0 means that robotics, artificial intelligence agents, and hybrid reality universes are expanding and creating their own transmedia ecosystems. The proliferation of human- machine and machine-machine interactions that take place in this environment are not simply mediated processes, they are hypermediated. We define hypermediated communication as involving some sort of machine intelligence on at least one end of an exchange. Google’s personalised, targeted advertising is an example of automated hypermediation. In this world, the role of hidden processes is growing and the visible part of communication is ever more fragmented. As teacher educators, we face the immense challenge of preparing young teachers not only to face this unknown world, but also to help their pupils learn to navigate in it and decide how it should evolve. How can we clearly identify the challenge for future educators? The authors propose that in this fragmented, hypermediated world, the most valuable strategy will be to create meaning by building connections. Information 4.0, Industry 4.0, transmedia, artificial intelligence, robotics, Internet of Things, deep learning, machine learning, Big Data, lifelong learning, ethics, neuroscience, social constructivism
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  • Pages: 22

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